See also TV & Brainwaves Published Studies





Sample Brainwaves

   while drawing:





Sample Brainwaves

   while reading:




Sample Brainwaves

   while watching TV:














Alpha:      1.53


Lobeta:    1.43


Beta:        2.67


Hibeta:     4.61


Gamma:  1.18









Sample Brainwaves while drawing:
















Alpha:      2.16


Lobeta:    1.30


Beta:        0.85


Hibeta:     4.50


Gamma:   0.23









Sample Brainwaves while Reading:


















Alpha:      1.43


Lobeta:    1.24


Beta:        0.98


Hibeta:     2.41


Gamma:   0.06









Sample Brainwaves while Watching TV:







Brainwaves:  A Comparison of the Samples




Drawing

Reading

Watching TV

Alpha:

1.53

2.16

1.43

Lobeta:

1.43

1.30

1.24

Beta:

2.67

0.85

0.98

Hibeta:

4.61

4.50

2.41

Gamma:

1.18

0.23

0.06



The electrode was placed at the Fp1 position, and the subject's brainwaves were measured for 11 to 12 minutes for each activity using the BrainMaster 1.9A EEG and software. Graph is based on Root-Mean-Square (RMS) scale.   See also BrainMaster Project





Brainwave Types (Wikipedia)


Alpha: 8 Hz to 12 Hz, associated with relaxation


Lo-Beta: 12 Hz to 15 Hz, normal waking consciousness


Beta: 15 Hz to 18 Hz, normal waking consciousness


Hi-Beta: 19 Hz to 25 Hz, normal waking consciousness


Gamma: 26 to 100 Hz, associated with perception  and consciousness and higher mental activity






"FP1 covers Brodmann area 10 on the front left side of the frontal lobe. This is part of the prefrontal cortex, that highly developed part of the brain which sets us apart from other mammals since it is responsible for the execution of cognitive tasks. Complex behaviours and simultaneous mental activities need a kind of working memory that keeps track of running tasks in either pending states or executive states. For most cognitive functions information needs to be retrieved after completion of another task. The prefrontal cortex co-ordinates all of this mental traffic and shows clear elevation in beta levels when performing calculative tasks, logical puzzles or other intellectual questions."  -  Staalhemel (July 2010)